Browse Items (14692 total)

Baragona, Alan.   Baragona's Literary Resources.
Provides links to online samples of Chaucer's works, "read by professors" and intended to "help students improve their pronunciation of Chaucer's Middle English." Includes passages from CT, TC, and other works. Formerly hosted at Virginia Military…

British Library.   London: British Library, n.d.
Four connected webpages that introduce Chaucer's language by focusing on the pronunciation and vocabulary of the GP descriptions of the Cook and Shipman, with an audio link, an image from Caxton's first edition, and exercises in vocabulary…

British Library.   London: British Library, n.d.
Digital reproduction of William Caxton's two editions of CT that enables onscreen comparison of them, with links to background information on Caxton and print history.

Delahoyde, Michael.   [Pullman]: Washington State University, n.d.
Pedagogical website that focuses on CT but includes internal links to descriptions of Chaucer's other works and to background information. Individual webpages provide descriptions of the Tales that comment on themes and critical issues, accompanied…

Wilks, Michael.   Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester 44 (1962): 489-530.
Traces in biblical, classical, and political sources the development of the idea that the Pope and other rulers gain sovereignty through "mystical marriage" to their respective institutions, arguing that WBT "bears a striking similarity to [this]…

Kökeritz, Helge.   New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1961.
Introduces pronunciation of Chaucer's English, offering a series of general rules, explained in relationship to Modern English, both "British and American" and designed for "teachers and students." Also includes transcriptions of nine passages in…

Coghill, Nevill.   D. S. Brewer, ed. Chaucer and Chaucerians: Critical Studies in Middle English Literature (University: University of Alabama Press; London: Nelson, 1966), pp. 114-39.
Describes Chaucer's rhetoric and style in CT, exploring his orchestration of narrative economy, climax, pace (especially in relation to rhyme and meter), and verisimilitude, Identifies "flaws" in SumT and PhyT, and admires the symbolic…

Coghill, Nevill.   London and New York: Published for the British Council and the National Book League by Longmans, Green, 1956.
Influential biographical discussion of Chaucer as the "first poet" of England "in the high culture of Europe," and the "most courteous to those who read or listen to him." Considers Chaucer's individual works in light of his life, medieval literary…

Cooney, Barbara.   New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1958. Rpt. New York: HarperCollins, 1986. Reissued with new cover illustration New York: HarperTrophy, 1989.
NPT, adapted and illustrated for juvenile audience.

Wilson, William Smith   Yale University Dissertation, 1960. Dissertation Abstracts International 31.06 (1970): 2893-94A. Full text available at ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global.
Considers HF to be an occasional poem, perhaps "written for Christmas Revels at the Inner Temple," and reads its three parts an "an allegorical representation of the trivium" that pertains to poetry, "testing the trivium, and rejecting it, and…

Hodgson, Phyllis, ed.   [London]: University of London. Athlone Press, 1960 and 1973.
Textbook edition of FranPT and the GP description of the Franklin, with text in Middle English, notes and glossary, and discussion of the Franklin's character, possible sources of FranT, and Chaucer's "inventiveness." Includes several appendixes:…

Musgrave, Thea, composer.   London: J. & W. Chester, 1960.
Sets MerB to orchestral music, sung by tenor; text in Middle English. A Special Oder Edition / Study Score was commissioned by the Saltire Music Group, apparently in 2009.

Baker, Donald C.   University of Mississippi Studies in English 1 (1960): 97-104.
Argues that "the role of the artist as purveyor of Fame" is the fundamental unifying theme of HF and suggests that Chaucer may have intended to resolve tensions between Dantean and Boethian views of the poet (as teacher and misleader, respectively)…

Baugh, Albert C.   Wolfgang Iser and Hans Schabram, eds. Britannica: Festschrift für Hermann M. Flasdieck (Heidelberg: Carl Winter, 1960), pp. 51-61.
Reviews discussions that consider Nicole de Margival's "La Panthère d'Amous" to be a source of HF, challenging most of them for lack of specificity or because shared details are conventional. Only two brief passages evince Margival's influence and…

Bayley, John.   John Bayley. The Characters of Love: A Study in the Literature of Personality (London: Constable, 1960), pp. 51-123.
Explores the characterizations in TC of Troilus, Pandarus, and, most extensively, Criseyde, explaining how Chaucer modifies their antecedents in Boccaccio's "Filostrato" by adapting the conventions and rhetoric of courtly love and creates rich…

Beichner, Paul E.   Richard J. Schoeck and Jerome Taylor, eds. Chaucer Criticism, Volume I: "The Canterbury Tales" (Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1960), pp. 117-29.
Praises the "high organic unity" of MilT, attributing it to effective characterization of the major actors: "by making him 'hende' in one sense or another, Chaucer has motivated each incident of the plot involving Nicholas; and similarly, he has…

Bethurum, Dorothy, ed.   New York: Columbia University Press, 1960.
Six essays by various authors and a summary Introduction by the editor. For five essays that pertain to Chaucer, search for Critical Approaches to Medieval Literature under Alternate Title

Donaldson, E. Talbot.   Dorothy Bethurum, ed. Critical Approaches to Medieval Literature: Selected Papers from the English Institute, 1958-59 (New York: Columbia University Press, 1960), pp. 1-26.
Challenges patristic criticism for its claim that medieval literature is univocally concerned with asserting Christian "caritas" allegorically, arguing instead that poetry has a right to "say what it means and mean what it says." Illustrates the…

Kaske, R. E.   In Dorothy Bethurum, ed. Critical Approaches to Medieval Literature: Selected Papers from the English Institute, 1958-59 (New York: Columbia University Press, 1960), pp. 27-60.
Exemplifies the wide-ranging importance of "exegetical tradition" in explicating images and allusions in medieval literature, drawing examples from "Piers Plowman," from the Summoner's taste for garlic, onions, and leeks (GP 1.634), and from various…

Utley, Francis Lee.   Dorothy Bethurum, ed. Critical Approaches to Medieval Literature: Selected Papers from the English Institute, 1958-59 (New York: Columbia University Press, 1960), pp. 83-109.
Examines critical opinions about the presence of mythic, folkloric, and ritualistic images and allusions in medieval English literature, commenting on various works and critical views of them: "Beowulf," "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight," accounts of…

Green, Richard Hamilton.   Dorothy Bethurum, ed. Critical Approaches to Medieval Literature: Selected Papers from the English Institute, 1958-59 (New York: Columbia University Press, 1960), pp. 110-33.
Summarizes theories and meanings of conventional mythographic images and allusions in medieval literature, derived from classical fables and allegorized in late-classical and medieval commentaries on such fables. Includes comments on the allusion to…

Schless, Howard.   Dorothy Bethurum, ed. Critical Approaches to Medieval Literature: Selected Papers from the English Institute, 1958-59 (New York: Columbia University Press, 1960), pp. 132-54.
Advocates a "contextual" approach to source study, arguing that several discussions of Dante's influence on Chaucer depend upon weak correspondences, better treated as shared tradition than direct influence. Discusses the lists of lovers in PF and…

Bevington, David M.   Notes and Queries 205 (1960): 129-30.
Addresses Chaucer's translation of Ovid's "portis" ("Metamorphoses" 12.45) as "porters" rather than "portals" in his House of Rumor (HF 1954).

Biggins, D.   Notes and Queries 205 (1960): 129-30.
Explores the denotative, connotative, figurative, and ironic implications of the GP description of the Wife of Bath as one who knows "muchel of wandrynge by the weye" (1.497).

Biggins, D.   Notes and Queries 205 (1960): 93-95.
Clarifies the reference to Christ catching Peter as he sailed in GP 1.696-98, focusing on the figurative meaning of "hente" and its implications regarding the Pardoner's faux relic, Peter's sail-cloth.
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