Browse Items (14534 total)

Borthwick, Sister Mary Charlotte.   Modern Language Quarterly 22 (1961): 227-35.
Reads Antigone's song (TC 2.827-75) as a "reply to Criseyde's objections to love" which precedes it in the narrative. Much of the song derives from Guillaume de Machaut's "Paradis d'Amour," but its sequence and several ideas mirror Criseyde's earlier…

Bronson, Bertrand H.   Studies in Philology 58 (1961): 583-96.
Argues that MerT "was composed before and independent of" MerP, initially addressed orally by Chaucer to a "courtly audience." Such listeners were familiar with the "humorous antifeministic tradition" into which the "senex amans" convention,…

Brosnahan, Leger.   Studies in Philology 58 (1961): 468-82.
Reviews and evaluates discussions of the authenticity of "the six-line continuation and the final couplet of the Nun's Priest's epilogue," agreeing on textual grounds with the "traditional judgment of scholars" that the lines are "inauthentic" and…

Burrow, J.   Medium Aevum 30 (1961): 33-37.
Explores parallels between several medieval analogues to Chaucer's use of the phrase "Latyn corrupt" in his description of Constance's language in MLT 2.519--the alliterative "Morte Arthure," the "Etymologiae" of Isidore of Seville (possibly, the…

Craig, Hardin.   In MacEdward Leach, ed. Studies in Medieval Literature in Honor of Albert Croll Baugh (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1961), pp. 97-106.
Comments on thematic similarities between Plato's "Gorgias," Boethius's "Consolation of Philosophy," and several of Chaucer's works, observing in TC a particular concern shared by Plato and Boethius: the "futility of earthly existence."

Ericson, Eston Everett.   English Studies 42 (1961): 306.
Offers evidence from Thomas Dekker's "The Bel-man of London" (1608) that supports reading "to pull a finch" as "having to do with extortion based upon a trumped-up charge of fornication," hence an accusation against the Summoner (GP 1.652) for…

French, W. H.   Modern Language Notes 76 (1961): 293-95.
Supports the reading of "hors" as plural in GP 1.74 on the grounds that "goode" in the same line is a plural form that "determines the number of the entire construction."

Gaylord, Alan.   Papers of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters 46 (1961): 571-95.
Describes how "the part Pandarus attempts to play" in TC "is intended by Chaucer, though not by Pandarus, as a parody of the philosophical counsel offered to Boethius" in the Consolation of Philosophy. Focuses on the comedy of the "first scene"…

Goffin, R. C.   Notes and Queries 206 (1961): 246.
Offers evidence from Rom that "tidings" in HF means "tales" rather than "news."

Gordon, James D.   In MacEdward Leach, ed. Studies in Medieval Literature in Honor of Albert Croll Baugh (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1961), pp. 81-96.
Surveys critics' attempts to correlate Ret with Chaucer's poetic accomplishments, commenting on biographical surmises, textual issues, and thematic concerns such as the putative waning of Chaucer's acuity, clerical influence, the firm linking of Ret…

Herz, Judith Scherer.   Modern Philology 58 (1961): 231-37.
Claims that CYT "depends on the metaphor of alchemy for both characterization and structure," discussing the Canon's Yeoman as a "fearful, naive, but by no means static" character and exploring the use of vocabulary of literary romance in his…

Hieatt, A. Kent, and Constance Hieatt, trans.   New York: Golden Press, 1961.
Adaptations of selections and abbreviations of CT in modern prose: GP, KnT, WBPT, FrPT, ClPT, FranPT, ThPT (in stanzaic poetry), NPPT, PardPT, CYPT, ManPT, and MLPT. Includes numerous color illustrations by Gustaf Tenggren and an Introduction (pp.…

Hinton, Norman D.   Names 9 (1961): 117-20.
Challenges previous arguments that the name "Malyne" is appropriate to the character in RvT because it means "dish cloth," arguing instead that "Malyne," "Aleyn," and their roles in RvT can better be understood in light of the denotations and…

Isaacs, Neil D.   Notes and Queries 206 (1961): 328-29.
Explains complications in defining "furlong wey" when it refers to time rather than distance, and examines Chaucer's several uses of the term to argue that it means "a short time, sometimes very short, sometimes only fairly short.

Kaske, R. E.   Richard J. Schoeck and Jerome Taylor, eds. Chaucer Criticism, Volume II: Troilus and Criseyde & The Minor Poems (Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1961), pp. 167-80.
Describes the Continental lyric genre of the "aube," linking it with the German "tagelied," assessing Chaucer's use of the form in Book 3 of TC, and addressing his use of source material derived from Boccaccio's "Filostrato." Concludes that Chaucer…

Lewis, R. W. B.   Yearbook of Comparative Literature 10 (1961): 7-15.
Explores difficulties of translating Virgil's "Aeneid," opening with commentary on HF 143-44 as "Chaucer's witty little critical essay on the problem."

Leach, MacEdward, ed.   Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1961.
Includes seventeen essays on various aspects of medieval literature: five on Chaucer, eight on other medieval literary studies, two on linguistics, and two on editing medieval texts. Includes a professional biography of Baugh and a partial list of…

Loomis, Roger Sherman.   In MacEdward Leach, ed. Studies in Medieval Literature in Honor of Albert Croll Baugh (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1961), pp. 21-44.
Gauges the extent and depth of Chaucer's philosophical and theological skepticism in comparison with the views of some of his contemporaries--Wycliff, Langland, Gower, Julian of Norwich, and more. Identifies skeptical attitudes on free will,…

Pratt, Robert A.   MacEdward Leach, ed. Studies in Medieval Literature in Honor of Albert Croll Baugh (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1961), pp. 45-79.
Proposes several "distinct stages" in Chaucer's development of the "magnificent individuality" of the Wife of Bath, focusing on his uses in WBP of source material drawn from Jerome, Theophrastus, Deschamps, and others. Assumes that the Man of Law…

Utley, Francis Lee.   MacEdward Leach, ed. Studies in Medieval Literature in Honor of Albert Croll Baugh (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1961), pp. 109-36.
Anatomizes and analyzes "some eighty-three scenes" in TC that "reveal" in the poem "the role of dialogue, the role of visual scene and image, the role of structural contrast, and the role of tempo and movement" and create "skillful ordering" and…

MacQueen, John.   Review of English Studies 12, no. 46 (1961): 117-31.
Explores the Boethian themes, imagery, and conventions of the "Kingis Quair," and comments on similarities and differences between its uses of these devices and those in BD, PF, TC, and KnT.

McCall, John P.   Modern Language Notes 76.3 (1961): 201-05.
Argues that Chaucer's references to May third, assigned in Ovidian tradition to "the goddess Flora and her celebrations," is a day on which the "force of love is especially and powerfully felt," and therefore "a suitable day for Pandare [TC 2.56],…

McNamara, Leo F.   Papers of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts and Letters 46 (1961): 231-37.
Rejects the "drunkenness hypothesis" as a way of explaining the Pardoner's character, arguing that pride and "counterfeit humility" underlie the characterization and that the "[s]uspicion, aversion, and contempt" of the pilgrim audience toward him…

Olson, Paul A.   ELH 28 (1961): 203-14.
Argues that in MerT "January's love of May reflects, in heightened colors," the Merchant's own "commercial love of the world's goods." Explores the possessive nature of January's love of May, focusing on the Merchant's metaphors and references to…

Olson, Paul A.   Texas Studies in Literature and Language 3 (1961): 259-63.
Explores the Merchant's "animus toward Italians or, at least, toward Lombards from Pavia" in his characterization of January. Responding to the Clerk's view of Lombards, the Merchant reflects late-medieval English malice against Italian commercial…
Output Formats

atom, dc-rdf, dcmes-xml, json, omeka-xml, rss2

Not finding what you expect? Click here for advice!