Browse Items (13779 total)

Correale, Robert M.   Chaucer Review 25 (1991): 238-65.
Because it contains the fewest emendations and corresponds most closely to Chaucer's MLT, the version of Les Cronicles in the MS Paris, Bibl. Nationale, Franc. 9687, fols. 1va-114va (ca. 1340-50), will serve as a base text for the Chaucer Library…

Kline, Barbara Rae.   Dissertation Abstracts International 52 (1991): 533A-34A.
This first in-depth description of MS. Harley 7333 provides textual information, lists editions, and describes relationships to other medieval texts. The contents shed light on scribal editing in CT.

Machan, Tim William.   A.N. Doane and Carol Braun Pasternack, eds. Vox Intexta: Orality and Textuality in the Middle Ages. (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1991), pp. 229-45.
Questions the role of orality in the recording and transmission of Middle English texts, suggesting that various attitudes and techniques of oral improvisation have left residues in these texts and that modern editors should use oral models. Draws…

Owen, Charles, A., Jr.   Cambridge: D.S. Brewer, 1991.
Chronologically surveys CT manuscripts, highlighting the importance of Hengwrt and the "wide difference in the number of independent textual traditions for different parts" of the work. Rejects the notion of a single Chaucerian copy text, crediting…

Pearsall, Derek, ed.   Cambridge: D.S. Brewer, 1990.
Thirteen essays by diverse hands discuss what Pearsall describes as the largest manuscript "the student of vernacular literature will ever be likely to have to deal with"--"a comprehensive programme of religious reading and instruction" (x). Five of…

Samuels, Michael.   Felicity Riddy, ed. Regionalism in Late Medieval Manuscripts and Texts: Essays Celebrating the Publication of A Linguistic Atlas of Late Mediaeval English. York Manuscripts Conferences: Proceedings Series, no. 2 (Cambridge: D.S. Brewer, 1991), pp. 1-7.
Explores editorial implications of the South-West Midlands features of several London copyings of works by Chaucer, Gower, and Langland, including four manuscripts of the CT (Ha4, La, Cp, Pw).

Smith, J. J.   J.J. Smith, ed. The English of Chaucer and His Contemporaries: Essays by M.L. Samuels and J.J. Smith (Aberdeen: Aberdeen University Press, 1988), pp. 96-113.
Working from an "archetypal" corpus of Gower's spelling forms,Smith explores the continuity and dissolution of these forms in manuscript tradition, as well as the relation of the corpus to the progress of Standard Written English and to practice in…

Smith, J. J.   J.J. Smith, ed. The English of Chaucer and His Contemporaries: Essays by M.L. Samuels and J.J. Smith (Aberdeen: Aberdeen University Press, 1988), pp. 51-69.
Analyzes the dialectical "Mischsprachen" (linguistic mixture) in Harley 7334 and Corpus Christi, Oxford, 198, and in products of the Gower D-Scribe. Since all three show an "idiosyncratic mixture of West Worcestershire forms and the learnt form,…

Crafton, John M.   Medieval Perspectives 4-5 (1989-90): 25-41.
Latini's Li livres du tresor influenced the rhetoric and structure of CT and LGWP, providing theory and models from the tradition of ars dictaminis.

Dinshaw, Carolyn.   R. F. Yeager, ed. Chaucer and Gower: Difference, Mutability, Exchange (Victoria B.C.: University of Victoria, 1991), pp. 130-52.
Discussions of the "quarrel" between Chaucer and Gower (anchored in MLP) pose a Chaucer who was free of base, ingratiating attitudes toward his sovereign and who was the source of pure poeticality--language and aesthetics unpolluted by self-interest.…

Elliott, Ralph (W. V.).   Michio Kawai, ed. Language and Style in English Literature: Essays in Honour of Michio Masui (Tokyo: Eihosha, 1991), pp. 74-95.
Compares the various landscape features in Chaucer's works with the walled garden of the Roman de la Rose. The merit of Chaucer's landscapes is that the poet tailored them to be part of an intimate, homey world.

Hertog, Erik.   Leuven: Leuven University Press, 1991.
Explores the phenomenon of literary analogues through a pragmatic and structuralist analysis of four salient components of narrative, each illustrated with examples from Chaucer's fabliaux and their analogues in various European languages. The…

Mann, Jill.   Erik Kooper, ed. This Noble Craft: Proceedings of the Xth Research Symposium of the Dutch and Belgian University Teachers of Old and Middle English and Historical Linguistics.... (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1991), pp. 173-88.
For Chaucer, the literary traditions of Ovid and Jerome created a dual image of woman as predator or victim. Chaucer refines and deepens the "double-sidedness" of these traditions, bringing the polarized alternatives into complicating relation with…

Mertens-Fonck, Paule.   Erik Kooper, ed. This Noble Craft: Proceedings of the Xth Research Symposium of the Dutch and Belgian University Teachers of Old and Middle English and Historical Linguistics.... (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1991), pp. 189-99.
Structurally, CT parodies the clerk-knight debate (an early type of courtly-love poem), especially The Council of Remiremont. The idea of a pilgrimage on horseback may derive from these debates as well.

Minnis, A. J.   R. F. Yeager, ed. Chaucer and Gower: Difference, Mutability, Exchange (Victoria B.C.: University of Victoria, 1991), pp. 36-74.
Chaucer is a poet with a highly developed sense of the relative--someone who instinctively shies away from those absolutes necessary for the creation of "auctoritas," who denies experience in love, and who claims to be a mere reporter. This stance…

Hanna, Ralph, III.   Tim William Machan, ed. Medieval Literature: Texts and Interpretation. Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies,no. 79. (Binghamton, N.Y.: Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, 1991), pp. 17-39.
English respect for vernacular authors anticipates the Renaissance. Chaucer created for our language and its heritage a conception of culturally significant authority based on textual correctness. More than other Middle English poets, Chaucer…

Pearsall, Derek.   Tim William Machan, ed. Medieval Literature: Texts and Interpretation. Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies,no. 79. (Binghamton, N.Y.: Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, 1991), pp. 41-57.
Most Chaucer criticism fails to mention that Chaucer's poetry is written in verse. The way we read that verse and respond to its musicality, whether in our heads or when reading aloud, is an important part of our interpretation of and response to…

Huppé, Bernard F.   Aldo S. Bernardo and Saul Levin, eds. The Classics in the Middle Ages: Papers of the Twentieth Annual Conference of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, no. 69 (Binghamton, N.Y.: Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 1990), 175-87.
Surveys the typology of journeying in Beowulf, Abelard's Calamaties, Chretien's Eric and Lancelot, Roman de la Rose, Dante's Vita nuova, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and Troilus's rise through the spheres in TC.

Nicholson, Peter.   Binghamton, N.Y.: Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, 1989
Line-by-line commentary on the Confessio that synthesizes criticism and scholarship. The introduction surveys critical tradition, and the notes clarify details, patterns,and literary relations of the work.

Speed, Diane, ed.   Sydney: Department of English, University of Sydney, 1989.
Correction and update of 1987 edition. Volume 1 includes a general introduction and bibliography, plus texts and introductions to Havelok, Sir Orfeo, Chevelere Assigne, Sir Cleges, Rauf Coilyear, and The Grene Knight. Volume 2 includes explanatory…

Wetherbee, Winthrop.   R. F. Yeager, ed. Chaucer and Gower: Difference, Mutability, Exchange (Victoria B.C.: University of Victoria, 1991), pp. 7-35.
There are significant differences between Chaucer's and Gower's appropriations of the Roman de la Rose and its Latin antecedents. Gower's priestly Genius is an authority figure in the tradition of Boethius's Consolation. Chaucer's rejection of…

Wimsatt, James I.   Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1991.
A comprehensive analysis of the contemporary French influence on Chaucer, exploring lyric rather than narrative features and concentrating on the impact of "formes fixes." Wimsatt devotes individual chapters to Chaucer's literary relations with Jean…

Wimsatt, James I.   Robert R. Edwards and Stephen Spector, eds. The Olde Daunce: Love, Friendship, Sex, and Marriage in the Medieval World (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1991), pp. 201-10, 287-89 (notes).
Examines "the paradigm of consoler-consolation-consolee" in The Consolation of Philosophy, Roman de la Rose, Remede de Fortune, and TC. The Consolation is "sub-text or perhaps super-text." The other texts mediate in Chaucer's adaptation of…

Yeager, R. F., ed.   Victoria, B.C.: University of Victoria, 1991.
The seven essays assess Gower and Chaucer as joint recipients of an antique heritage, as readers of (and borrowers from) each other's works, and as writers whose work reveals much about late-medieval attitudes toward language and about the constantly…

Yeager, R. F.   Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 1990.
Examines Gower's efforts to establish his reputation as a poet. Frequently using Chaucer for comparison or contrast, Yeager explores Gower's stylistics, his concerns with audience, his relations with French tradition and particular sources, his…
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