Browse Items (13294 total)

Jameson, Thomas H.   Arts and Sciences n.v. (1964): 10-13.
Summarizes ClT, describing it as a successful riposte to WBT and a victory for "book-learning."

Wood, Chauncey.   Modern Language Quarterly 25 (1964): 259-71.
Argues that the astrological data in GP and MLH establish the date of the beginning of the Canterbury pilgrimage as April 17, the same day as the departure of Noah's ark, evoking notions of sinfulness and salvific baptism, reinforced by imagery of…

Wenzel, Siegfried.   PMLA 79 (1964): 542-47.
Argues that in Book 4 of TC Chaucer presents a "conflict between reason and desire" (amplified from Boccaccio's "Filostrato"), helping to characterize and evaluate Troilus as, simultaneously and ambiguously, "both strong and weak," reasonable as a…

Steadman, John M.   Medium Aevum 33.2 (1964): 121-30.
Argues that the old man of PardT is neither a Messenger of Death nor Old Age personified, but a figure of the exemplary wisdom and virtue of the aged, set in contrast the youthful rioters and their foolish avarice. Compares Chaucer's "aged stranger"…

Severs, J. Burke.   Philological Quarterly 43 (1964): 27-39.
Re-examines the narrator's eight-year sickness in BD, surveying previous commentary, and arguing that, unlike in Chaucer's French sources, the illness is insomnia rather than love-sickness and that God rather than a paramour is his only physician. As…

Reiss, Edmund.   College English 25.4 (1964): 260-66.
Investigates the dramatic ironies of PardPT (comparing them with those of WBPT), arguing that the Pardoner does not reveal "more than he intends, but rather the converse": that none of the pilgrims "is able to see the full meaning of what he says"…

Pearsall, D. A.   University of Toronto Quarterly 34 (1964): 82-92.
Characterizes the Squire as a "young man among his elders" on the pilgrimage, describing his "nervous, apologetic tone" that derives from his uses and abuses of "rhetorical decorum, "tinged with "self-regard" and snobbish "anti-intellectualism." The…

MacDonald, Angus.   Neophilologus 48 (1964): 235-37.
Explores the background and implications of the reference to "seinte Note" (St. Neot) and the possibility of punning in "viritoot" in MilT 1.3770-71.

Kean, P. M.   Medium Aevum 33.1 (1964): 36-46.
Close comparison of passages in TC and their sources in Boccaccio's "Filostrato" discloses how Chaucer "sets in motion" early in his poem "a train of events whose implications go far beyond the immediate moment, perhaps beyond the love story itself,"…

Hawkins, Sherman.   Journal of English and Germanic Philology 63 (1964): 599-624.
Explores the Augustinian "figurative implications" of PrT, identifying a "clear symbolic pattern" evident in interpreting it Scripturally—the "childishness" of the teller and her protagonist, the literalness of the Jews, echoes of the liturgy of…

Gaylord, Alan T.   ELH 31 (1964): 331-65.
Argues that FranT is one of Chaucer "satiric masterpieces" and that it reveals "how ludicrously and inadequately the Franklin grasps the essence of gentle behavior." The Franklin is well intended, but the morality and reasoning of his Tale are…

Fisher, John H.   New York: New York University Press, 1964.
Describes the development of John Gower's critical reputation, his life records, his literary career (including attention to manuscripts, sequence of composition, and revisions), the major social and political themes of his works, and his…

Dronke, Peter.   Medium Aevum 33.1 (1964): 47-52.
Contrasts Troilus's ascent through the spheres at the end of TC and the narrator's comments on it with the analogous materials in Boccaccio's "Filostrato" and "Teseida" (with nods to Dante and Christian liturgy), explaining Troilus's placement among…

Wood, Chauncey Derby.   Dissertation Abstracts International 25.05 (1964): A2970.
Describes medieval understanding of astrology and examines the "technical side of astrological passages in Chaucer" as well as their "meanings . . . in their poetic contexts. Includes discussion of FranT, Mars, GP, MilT, WBP, MerT, MLT, and ParsP.

Wilson, William S.   Quarterly Journal of Speech 50 (1964): 153-58.
Shows that the diction, style, and substance of the Eagle's disquisition on sound in HF (606-863) illustrate the "techniques of Ciceronian persuasive rhetoric on a relevant science, the physics of sound," part of the poem's unifying concern with the…

Westlund, Joseph.   Philological Quarterly 43 (1964): 526-37.
Argues that the KnT is "especially suitable for the beginning of the pilgrimage" in CT because it "presents the continual subversion of noble efforts to bring order out of disorder" and because, in comparison with its sources," it poses a "pagan…

Watson, Charles S.   Studies in Short Fiction 1 (1964): 277-88.
Regards MkT and NPT as "Chaucer's highest literary achievement in the construction of pairs of tales," arguing that the faults of the MkT are "redeemed" by juxtaposition with the "brilliant" NPT insofar as the pair pose several "arresting contrasts":…

Thomson, Patricia.   Review of English Studies 15 (1964): 262-67.
Argues that Thomas Wyatt's ballade "If thou wilt mighty be" translates directly from Boethius's "Consolation of Philosophy," unmediated by Chaucer's Bo; his use of the ballade form, however, may have been inspired by Chaucer's Truth. Compares and…

Sternberg, Irma Ottenheimer.   Dissertation Abstracts International 25.12 (1964): A5392.
Argues that MLT is neither saints' legend nor romance, but that its "heroic theme, setting, and characters suggest strongly that . . . it belongs to the literary genre of epic and to the sociological genre of myth."

Steinberg, Aaron.   College English 26.3 (1964): 187-91.
Compares the knight's decision in the marriage bed of WBT to that of the analogous one in the more mythic "Marriage of Sir Gawain," arguing that in the context of Chaucer's relatively realistic Tale, the decision to return the choice to the loathly…

Southworth, James G.   College English 26.3 (1964) 173-79.
Critiques the editorial practice of "smoothing" Chaucer's verse to produce iambic pentameter rhythms by adjustments to final-"e," and advocates following medieval scribal practice of using the "'punctus elevatus'—the medial mark" to indicate the…

Sommer, George Joseph.   Dissertation Abstracts International 25.09 (1964): A3732-33.
Examines the "compassion" of the narrator of TC as his dominant attitude, "paradoxically allied" to his "helplessness" before "inexorable fate," and modified by his didactic intent, "historical perspective," and "ironic detachment."

Saito, Mother Masako, R.S.C.J.   Dissertation Abstracts International 25.03 (1964): A1897.
Explores the archetypal imagery of bondage and liberation from bondage in five "clusters" in CT: chivalric prison, animal confinement, "juridical bondage with its emphasis on 'wit,' entrapment, and hell and purgatory.

Rumble, T. C.   Philological Quarterly 43 (1964): 130-33.
Interprets "chiere" of KnT 1.2683 as "frame of mind" or "state of feeling," and maintains that this obviates the question of the whether or not the preceding two lines on the fickleness of women are spurious.

Rhys, Brinley.   Dissertation Abstracts International 25.08 (1964): 3327A.
Organizes the narratorial passages of TC into six groups, and examines them in light of this classification: occupation, courtly love, humor, characterization, Boethian philosophy, and "medievalization," finding that the narrator is most important to…
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